• Frys.com #5812373
  • Manufacturer: Sony Pictures
  • UPC #043396253704
  • Model #25370

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    Detailed Description
    (Manufacturer # 25370 )

    Plot
      Jay Hernandez, Jennifer Carpenter, and Johnathon Schaech star in this remake of Jaume Balaguer and Paco Plaza's successful, Spanish-language horror film [REC], which follows a television reporter and her cameraman as they fall under a mysterious quarantine issued on an inner-city apartment building. Television reporter Angela Vidal (Carpenter) and her trusty cameraman (Steve Harris) were documenting a night in the life of a Los Angeles fire station crew when the firefighters were summoned to a nearby apartment building to answer a routine 911 call. Upon arriving at the scene, Angela and company discover that police have already arrived to investigate the blood-curdling screams ringing out from one of the apartments. One of the women living in the building has been infected with something terrible, but what? When a few of the other residents are viciously attacked, they try to escape and discover that the CDC has quarantined the building. The officials in charge won't relay any information to those trapped inside the building, and it's impossible to seek information from the outside since telephone, Internet, television, and cell-phone access have all been cut off. By the time the quarantine is lifted, the intrepid cameraman's chilling footage provides the only evidence of the horrors that unfolded on that terrible night. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi
    Movie Type
      Horror
    Movie Level Themes
      Trapped or Confined, Members of the Press, Plagues and Epidemics
    Movie Level Tones
      Disturbing, Tense, Gruesome, Stylized

    DVD Features

    • "Locked In: The Making of Quarantine"
    • "Anatomy of a Stunt" featurette
    • "Dressing the Infected: Robert Hall's Make-up Design"
    • Commentary with writer/director John Erick Dowdle and writer/producer Drew Dowdle
    Awards
      AMG Rating

      Review

        Intense handheld zombie frights are in store for viewers daring to take the leap into Quarantine, the American remake of Spain's heralded first-person chiller [REC]. Unfolding in near real time, the pic aims to put the audience into the action of an emergency response call gone horribly wrong. Claustrophobic, jittery at times, and electric in pace, Quarantine is a stripped-down bloody thrill ride that -- while certainly not catering to everyone's tastes -- should satisfy gore-hounds looking to step up their theatrical horror cuisine beyond the usual creepy little kid rehashes. That's not to say that the shocking flick is altogether a home run. Fans of its forefather will be a bit perplexed that some of the best parts of the ending were not carried over to this near shot-for-shot redo. Where the original took the tale into a whole new creepy arena in its final moments, the remake's filmmaking team of brothers Drew and John E. Dowdle (the duo behind the similarly shot Poughkeepsie Tapes) seem more interested in keeping true to the switch-up of shooting style, rather than also injecting the plot with an added layer of disturbance. New viewers should still find the proceedings to be frightful, even if they are missing a big key as to why the predecessor has stayed ingrained in so many viewers' brains. As it is, the new production is a gruesome exercise in frantic pacing that hardly lets up throughout its 90-minute running time. Behind the scenes, the production impresses with its long takes and well-choreographed (if not a bit hard to discern) set pieces. The cast does what it can with the material, with Jennifer Carpenter turning up the hysteria when needed and Johnathon Schaech (complete with a bushy 'stache) adding macho heft to the production. All things considered, the picture doesn't do nearly the damage that other remakes have wrought. What story the film has is still a bleak one -- it's just a matter of whether the right people looking for this kind of frenzied experience will find it or not. Even more of a question to ask is why the American production yearned so much to adhere to scene-by-scene reenactments, only to wimp out when it came to the well-regarded finale? Then again, this is the same studio that decided to give away many of the twists and turns in all of the movie's advertising, so maybe audiences should take what they get and at least be thankful for that. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi


      Requirements


      Blu-Ray Drive or Blu-Ray Player





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